For African Nationals

UC Berkeley Affiliated Funding

UC Berkeley is a partner in The MasterCard Foundation Scholars Program, a fellowship for students from Sub-Saharan Africa. This global education initiative will provide 17,000 talented, yet economically disadvantaged, students from developing countries – particularly in Africa – with comprehensive support for secondary and university education. At UC Berkeley, this program provides comprehensive support – financial, academic, social, and career counseling – to 119 students from Sub-Saharan Africa from 2012 to 2020. Scholars pursue both undergraduate and professional master's degrees.

The Center for African Studies offers the Emeka Kalu Ezera Fellowship for Dissertation Research.

The International House offers a fellowship, The Daniel Mouen-Makoua Gateway Fellowship, for first-year doctoral students with financial need. Recipients will receive academic year room and board at International House to be matched with tuition and fees from a UC Berkeley department. In addition, the recipient will receive a $5,000 stipend from UC Berkeley's Graduate Division. Students from Sub-Saharan Africa will be given the highest priority. Students will be nominated by the admitting UC department for fellowship consideration. Final selection will be determined by faculty committee review. International House has other fellowships covering room and board for which African students might be eligible.

Funding Beyond Berkeley

Below are other links to information that might be useful to students from African countries interested in finding fellowships to study in the United States. Please send updates, additions and corrections to us at asc@berkeley.edu

eduPass -- http://www.edupass.org/

A comprehensive web site from FinAid, the Financial Aid Information Page [http://www.finaid.org/] specifically for foreign students. They claim they can help students from the beginning of the process to the end. One page on the site lists schools that have given scholarships to foreign students. [http://www.edupass.org/finaid/undergraduate.phtml] To be included in the lists, the schools must have an average award that is greater than 1/5 of the cost of attendance. Note that none of the ten University of California campuses were listed in 2005.

The site includes free financial aid searches based on a student's particular profile. The site’s database pages can be very slow. This could mean that it is difficult to get to the information if one does not have a high-speed hookup. The database is extensive though and maybe worth the wait.

Karen Fung's Africa South of the Sahara site

On this site, there are two pages with information on funding opportunities although they are not necessarily specific to African nationals.

Two of the most relevant links are below, but students would want to look at all the others in case there is something that works for them.

2004 Rockefeller Guide to Funding for African Students ~ Old but potential useful

Financial Aid for International Students and Scholars for Study or Research in the United States and Abroad

On the Library web site of the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
http://researchguides.library.wisc.edu/content.php?pid=33330&sid=244562

Kubatana.net: 2002-2003 Resource Guide: a Selected List of Fellowships, Scholarships, Grants and other training opportunities for African Women Students/Scholars.

http://archive.kubatana.net/html/archive/women/021216iewad.asp?sector=RESOUR

Rotary Foundation

https://www.rotary.org/en
Most African countries have Rotary Clubs.

University of Pennsylvania Africa Page, Grants section

http://www.sas.upenn.edu/African_Studies/Grants/menu_Grants.html
with a special section for international students: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/African_Studies/Grants/International_Students_10206.html

Various African Studies Programs around the United States

Visit web sites for African studies programs around the country.
http://library.stanford.edu/africa-south-sahara/browse-topic/about-african-studies/african-studies-programs